Planetarium Show Schedule

Calendar

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Now Showing

Main Feature

August 22 – December 31, 2017

Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

Poster for “Cosmic Origins Spectrograph.”

“Cosmic Origins Spectrograph”

This planetarium program, created by Fiske Planetarium in Colorado, highlights the current research of the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph (C.O.S.) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, the last instrument installed by NASA astronauts. C.O.S. is allowing us an unprecedented view into the vast spaces between galaxies which surrounds our own Milky Way. Join us in the exploration of this hidden universe as we decode the secrets to the origins of the cosmos.

The show is followed by a brief tour of our current night sky using our Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 optical star projector.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

November 4 – December 31, 2017

Two Small Pieces of Glass

& Galileo’s Skies

Poster of “Two Small Pieces of Glass” & “Galileo’s Skies.”

“Two Small Pieces of Glass & Galileo’s Skies”

“Two Small Pieces of Glass” looks at 400 years of telescopic discovery while “Galileo’s Skies” transports viewers 400 years into the past to relive the fascinating skies of discovery for Galileo Galilei. This is an exciting double feature.

“Two Small Pieces of Glass” was produced by the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i, Interstellar Studios, and the Carnegie Science Center and distributed through the National Science Foundation. Viewers will learn about the different types of telescopes as well as how they were used for discovery about our Universe. Travel across time and the globe to witness the people and places that propelled the science of astronomy.

“Galileo’s Skies” is an original production of Bays Mountain Planetarium. It will captivate the audience as we go back 400 years into the past and see the exact sky of Galileo in Padua, Italy, 1609. Witness the positions of the planets as they were seen for the first time with a telescope and learn why Galileo is considered so highly in today’s society.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upcoming Shows

Main Feature

January 2 – April 29, 2018

Out There –

The Quest for Extrasolar Worlds

The poster for the planetarium show “Out There.”

“Out There – The Quest for Extrasolar Worlds”

With the world’s most powerful telescopes, we are able to explore the Universe surrounding us and start looking for planets around other stars.

For thousands of years, mankind thought that the Earth was the center of the Universe. Thanks to our curiosity, imagination and urge to explore, we now know that planets like our Earth are nothing special in the cosmos. The Sun is just one ordinary star among hundreds of billions in our galaxy, the Milky Way. With the world’s most powerful telescopes, we are able to explore more and more of the Universe. What we have found so far has surpassed even the wildest expectations of scientists as well as authors of science fiction. Most stars have planets — it turns out they are more common than we thought.
A huge diversity of different worlds is out there, just waiting to be discovered.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

January 6 – February 25, 2018

Appalachian Skies – Winter

Poster for "Appalachian Skies - Winter"

Poster for “Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. Its fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

March 3 – April 29, 2018

A Part of the Sky Called Orion

Poster for “A Part of the Sky Called Orion”

“A Part of the Sky Called Orion”

“A Part of the Sky Called Orion” looks at how three different ancient cultures looked at the same part of the sky we may know as the Greek constellation Orion. The show focuses on the Greek, Egyptian, and Inupiaq cultures along with their different star stories and images using the night sky. It is a treat for the whole family with wonderful art, music and storytelling.
The show was produced in-house by Bays Mountain Productions and designed to look at the big ideas that have guided human understanding of the cosmos and its patterns in the sky.
The show will be followed by a tour of our current night sky using our stunning Carl Zeiss Starmaster ZKP-4 star projector.
Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Main Feature

May 1 – August 31, 2018

Seeing!

The poster for the planetarium show “Seeing!”

“Seeing!”

Full-dome Planetarium Program Follows the Creation of a Photon and its Journey Across the Galaxy to a Young Stargazer’s Eye

SEEING! – A Photon’s Journey Across Space, Time and Mind
Funded through a generous grant by Zeiss, “SEEING!” brings the story of sight and vision to planetariums worldwide. Produced by Mirage3D and Koenig Films, “SEEING!” follows a photon’s creation and journey across the galaxy to a young stargazer’s eye. The viewer follows the photon into the girl’s eye, learning the structures of the eye and their functions, prior to taking a ride on the optic nerve. “Seeing!” was directed by Robin Sip, written by Emmy Award© winning writer Kris Koenig and narrated by Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, American astrophysicist, cosmologist, author, science communicator and the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space in New York City.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

May 5 – July 1, 2018

Appalachian Skies – Spring

Poster for Bays Mountain's own planetarium show, "Appalachian Skies - Spring"

Poster for Bays Mountain’s own planetarium show, “Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. Its fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

July 2 – August 31, 2018

Back to the Moon – For Good

Poster for “Back to the Moon – For Good”

“Back to the Moon – For Good”

Immerse yourself in a race to return to the Moon 40 years after the historic Apollo landings. See how a competition among privately funded international teams is ushering in a new era of lunar exploration. Learn about the Moon’s resources and discover what humanity’s future on the Moon might hold. Narrated by Tim Allen, “Back To The Moon – For Good” presents the Google Lunar XPRIZE, and the personal stories of competition and collaboration it inspires.

The show is immediately followed by a two-part live presentation. The first highlights the moon and its major features. The second utilizes our Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector in which we’ll highlight our current night sky and its major constellations and any Solar System objects visible.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Main Feature

September 1 – December 31, 2018

Sunstruck

The poster for the planetarium show “Sunstruck.”

“Sunstruck”

Travel back to the beginning of time and experience the birth of the Sun. Discover how it came to support life, how it threatens life as we know it, and how its energy will one day fade away.
The show is immediately followed by a live presentation that utilizes our Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector in which we’ll highlight our current night sky and its major constellations and any Solar System objects visible.

Show length ~40 min.


 

Alternate Feature

September 1 – October 28, 2018

Appalachian Skies – Fall

Poster image of the Fall version of Appalachian Skies

“Appalachian Skies – Fall”

“Appalachian Skies – Fall” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. Its fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

November 3 – December 31, 2018

Planetary Visions

A small version of the poster for our Solar System show, “Planetary Visions.”

“Planetary Visions”

“Planetary Visions” is a fantastic, interactive program that is best described as an adventurous tour of the Solar System. With its whimsical, flying robot main character, Toggle, and the interactivity of the operator with the show and the audience, this is a treat for all who attend.

This program was produced by Bays Mountain Productions and highlights the incredible talents of the exhibits and planetarium staff. The program includes a tour of the current night sky.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Main Feature

January 2 – April 28, 2019

The Dark Matter Mystery –

Exploring a Cosmic Secret

The poster for the planetarium show “Dark Matter Mystery.”

“The Dark Matter Mystery – Exploring a Cosmic Secret”

What keeps galaxies together? What are the building blocks of the Universe? What makes the Universe look the way it looks today? Researchers all around the world try to answer these questions. We know today that approximately a quarter of the Universe is filled with a mysterious glue: dark matter. We know that it is out there, but we have no idea what it is made out of.

This planetarium show takes you on the biggest quest of contemporary astrophysics. You will learn why we know that dark matter exists and how this search is one of the most challenging and exciting searches science has to offer. Join the scientists on their hunt for dark matter with experiments in space and deep underground. Will they be able to solve… the Dark Matter Mystery?

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

January 5 – February 24, 2019

Appalachian Skies – Winter

Poster for "Appalachian Skies - Winter"

Poster for “Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. Its fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

March 2 – April 28, 2019

Exploring New Horizons

Poster for Exploring New Horizons – A Bays Mountain Production.

“Exploring New Horizons”

“Exploring New Horizons” explores the New Horizons spacecraft and its mission to dwarf planet Pluto and other KBOs. This program also exhibits the importance of the scientific method and how it applies to our understanding of the Solar System.
Starting from ancient times, learn about the history of planetary discovery, especially that of Pluto, and how it has led to an amazing mission to explore the Kuiper Belt. A basic overview of the whole Solar System is included.

The show will be followed by an update on the mission and it’s recent pass by MU69. A tour of our current night sky using our stunning Carl Zeiss Starmaster ZKP-4 star projector follows.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

May 4 – June 30, 2019

Appalachian Skies – Spring

Poster for Bays Mountain's own planetarium show, "Appalachian Skies - Spring"

Poster for Bays Mountain’s own planetarium show, “Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. Its fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.