Planetarium Show Schedule

Calendar

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Now Showing

Main Feature

January 3 – April 16, 2017

The Hot and Energetic Universe

The poster for “The Hot and Energetic Universe” planetarium show.

“The Hot and Energetic Universe”

“The Hot and Energetic Universe” takes visitors on a cosmic journey. A journey that uses astronomical observatories throughout the world and those above the Earth’s atmosphere. All types of celestial phenomena are studied, but a focus is set upon those of high energy. These objects are part of the very hot and violent Universe.
High Energy Astrophysics probes hot gas in clusters of galaxies, which are the most massive objects in the Universe. It also probes hot gas accreting around supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies.
Finally, high energy radiation provides important information about our own galaxy, neutron stars, supernova remnants and stars like our Sun which emit copious amounts of high energy radiation.
The XMM-Newton and the Integral missions, are leading the exploration of the X-ray and gamma-ray Universe. ESA‘s mission ATHENA, to be launched in 2028, will carry the most sensitive X-ray telescope ever and it will be the flagship of all high X-ray missions.
The producer of this documentary is the “Integrated Activities in the High-Energy Astrophysics Domain” (AHEAD).
AHEAD is a project funded by the European Commission in the framework of Horizon2020. It is led by IAPS/INAF in Rome and involves most Universities and Research institutes which are involved in High Energy Astrophysics in Europe. The project aims to combine the efforts of all these Institutes in the analysis of X-ray data and facilitate the access to infrastructures distributed across Europe.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

January 7 – February 26, 2017

Appalachian Skies – Winter

Poster for "Appalachian Skies - Winter"

Poster for “Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upcoming Shows

 

Alternate Feature

March 4 – April 30, 2017

Connections

Poster for “Connections”

“Connections”

“Connections” is an incredible journey that you’ll take from our own back yard to the farthest reaches of space. Our premier in-house full-dome production immerses you in a multitude of environments in which you are literally surrounded with beautiful imagery and sound. From the serenity of a wooded forest to the awe-inspiring majesty of the constellations, planets, galaxy, and universe, you’ll be amazed to see that we are all connected. Connections highlights many educational standards.

The focus being on how all things are connected. We learn by our senses to see that a forest, a field, or deep space are all three-dimensional and that we can move about to gain an understanding of our place in the Cosmos. Students will realize that all things cast shadows and that day and night are determined if the sun is shining above or is behind a planet respectively. Our movement on land, an animal’s motion in a forest, or a planet’s rotation and revolution are all different examples of how things move. Part of our connection with the night sky is through the history of observations and mythology. Ancient constellations and modern line drawings are shown to illustrate our human ancestry and the fun of getting out under your own night sky. The show will be followed by a tour of our current night sky.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

Main Feature

April 18 – August 20, 2017

Totality

The poster ad for “Totality,” a Bays Mountain Planetarium production.

“Totality”

“Totality” is a fascinating look at all the wonders of eclipses, especially total solar eclipses. An eclipse is described simply as when one celestial object blocks another from our view. This program, produced by Bays Mountain Planetarium, examines what eclipses are, how and when they occur, and what wonderful sights they create. We also look back to a fascinating period in scientific discovery when general relativity was proven with the photographic recording of a total solar eclipse.

Our production includes a variety of wonderful styles – from spectacular space environments to humorous pop-up books. A very special part of the show relates, in a very human way, what happens when you are caught in the shadow of the Moon and the Sun is plunged into a total solar eclipse. You will love this program.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the trailer for “Totality,” an original production of Bays Mountain all about eclipses. Please view in full frame and select 1080p to enjoy the trailer’s full resolution.

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

May 6 – June 30, 2017

Appalachian Skies – Spring

Poster for Bays Mountain's own planetarium show, "Appalachian Skies - Spring"

Poster for Bays Mountain’s own planetarium show, “Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

July 1 – August 31, 2017

Chasing the Ghost Particle –

From the South Pole

to the Edge of the Universe

Poster for Chasing the Ghost Particle – From the South Pole to the Edge of the Universe

“Chasing the Ghost Particle – From the South Pole to the Edge of the Universe”

Deep in the ice at the heart of Antarctica, the biggest and strangest detector in the world waits for mysterious messengers from the cosmos. Scientists are using tiny and elusive particles called neutrinos to explore the insides of stars and galaxies. These ghostly neutrinos give us an exclusive look into exploding stars and black holes.

In this program, stunning views of the most extreme places in our universe, the galaxies around us, and the Earth and the Sun await. They are just a prelude to a thrilling journey inside the detector, looking for traces of neutrinos from when they collide with atoms in the ice. From one of the most remote locations on Earth to the unexplored regions of the cosmos, “Chasing the Ghost Particle: From the South Pole to the Edge of the Universe” will take you on a journey you will never forget.

Chasing the Ghost Particle is a co-production of the Milwaukee Public Museum and the Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC) of the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

The program is immediately followed by the use of our Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 optical star projector with a tour of our current night sky and a look at the southern celestial skies of Antarctica.

Show length ~40 min.

 

Alternate Feature

September 2 – October 29, 2017

Appalachian Skies – Fall

Poster image of the Fall version of Appalachian Skies

“Appalachian Skies – Fall”

“Appalachian Skies – Fall” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

November 4 – December 31, 2017

Two Small Pieces of Glass

& Galileo’s Skies

Poster of “Two Small Pieces of Glass” & “Galileo’s Skies.”

“Two Small Pieces of Glass & Galileo’s Skies”

“Two Small Pieces of Glass” looks at 400 years of telescopic discovery while “Galileo’s Skies” transports viewers 400 years into the past to relive the fascinating skies of discovery for Galileo Galilei. This is an exciting double feature.

“Two Small Pieces of Glass” was produced by the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i, Interstellar Studios, and the Carnegie Science Center and distributed through the National Science Foundation. Viewers will learn about the different types of telescopes as well as how they were used for discovery about our Universe. Travel across time and the globe to witness the people and places that propelled the science of astronomy.

“Galileo’s Skies” is an original production of Bays Mountain Planetarium. It will captivate the audience as we go back 400 years into the past and see the exact sky of Galileo in Padua, Italy, 1609. Witness the positions of the planets as they were seen for the first time with a telescope and learn why Galileo is considered so highly in today’s society.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

January 6 – February 25, 2018

Appalachian Skies – Winter

Poster for "Appalachian Skies - Winter"

Poster for “Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

March 3 – April 29, 2018

Exploring New Horizons

Poster for Exploring New Horizons – A Bays Mountain Production.

“Exploring New Horizons”

“Exploring New Horizons” looks at Pluto. We travel through time to witness the forward progression of discovery in our Solar System and find out how important the scientific method really is. We see how Pluto was discovered and how we understand it today as the most popular of dwarf planets. We also ride along the New Horizons spacecraft and experience Pluto first hand. A live activity highlights Pluto’s discovery and the show ends with a live update of the New Horizons mission.

This show is an original Bays Mountain Production.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

May 5 – July 1, 2018

Appalachian Skies – Spring

Poster for Bays Mountain's own planetarium show, "Appalachian Skies - Spring"

Poster for Bays Mountain’s own planetarium show, “Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

July 2 – August 31, 2018

Planetary Visions

A small version of the poster for our Solar System show, “Planetary Visions.”

“Planetary Visions”

“Planetary Visions” is a fantastic, interactive program that is best described as an adventurous tour of the Solar System. With its whimsical, flying robot main character, Toggle, and the interactivity of the operator with the show and the audience, this is a treat for all who attend.

This program was produced by Bays Mountain Productions and highlights the incredible talents of the exhibits and planetarium staff. The program includes a tour of the current night sky.

Show length ~40 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

September 1 – October 28, 2018

Appalachian Skies – Fall

Poster image of the Fall version of Appalachian Skies

“Appalachian Skies – Fall”

“Appalachian Skies – Fall” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

November 3 – December 31, 2018

Dark

Poster for the planetarium show “Dark.”

“Dark”

The search for Dark Matter is the most pressing astrophysical problem of our time – the solution to which will help us understand why the Universe is as it is, where it came from, and how it has evolved over billions of years – the unimaginable depths of deep time, of which a human life is but a flickering instant.

The show is presented by Dr Alan Duffy, a brilliant young astronomer from the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) at the University of Western Australia – who creates simulations of Dark Matter evolution inside supercomputers. Alan introduces us to the idea of Dark Matter, why astronomers think it exists, and explains why Radio Astronomy is so well-suited to its discovery.

We journey through completely immersive visualisations of Dark Matter evolution calculated upon some of the world’s fastest supercomputers – cosmological visions on a truly vast scale, in which galaxies themselves are but points of light, distributed across far larger intergalactic structures of Dark Matter.

The show includes a live activity and a live tour of the current night sky.

Show length ~40 min.

 

Alternate Feature

January 5 – February 24, 2019

Appalachian Skies – Winter

Poster for "Appalachian Skies - Winter"

Poster for “Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter”

“Appalachian Skies – Winter” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Feature

March 2 – April 28, 2019

A Part of the Sky Called Orion

Poster for “A Part of the Sky Called Orion”

“A Part of the Sky Called Orion”

“A Part of the Sky Called Orion” looks at how three different ancient cultures looked at the same part of the sky we may know as the Greek constellation Orion. The show focuses on the Greek, Egyptian, and Inupiaq cultures along with their different star stories and images using the night sky. It is a treat for the whole family with wonderful art, music and storytelling.

The show was produced in-house by Bays Mountain Productions and designed to look at the big ideas that have guided human understanding of the cosmos and its patterns in the sky.

The show will be followed by a tour of our current night sky using our stunning Carl Zeiss Starmaster ZKP-4 star projector.

Show length ~40 min.

 

Alternate Feature

May 4 – June 30, 2019

Appalachian Skies – Spring

Poster for Bays Mountain's own planetarium show, "Appalachian Skies - Spring"

Poster for Bays Mountain’s own planetarium show, “Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring”

“Appalachian Skies – Spring” will take visitors on a majestic tour of the evening sky using the spectacular Carl Zeiss ZKP-4 star projector instrument. It’s fiber-optic generated star field is stunning and a pleasure to see. You don’t want to miss it! Produced in house and led by planetarium staff, learn what fascinating constellations will be easily visible. Marvel at their ancient lore. Find out what planets are easily seen as well. Visitors will take this knowledge home and be able to locate these sights for themselves.

Show length ~35 min.